Screenwriters' mission this ninth time around was to give the James Bond character more maturity, fewer gadgetry gimmicks, and more humor. On the last item [Live and Let Die, 1973] they fumbled badly; and the comparatively spare arrays of mechanical devices seem more a cost-cutting factor.

Screenwriters’ mission this ninth time around was to give the James Bond character more maturity, fewer gadgetry gimmicks, and more humor. On the last item [Live and Let Die, 1973] they fumbled badly; and the comparatively spare arrays of mechanical devices seem more a cost-cutting factor.

Story diverts Bond from tracking down a missing solar energy scientist towards the mission of locating mysterious international hit man (Christopher Lee) who uses tailor-made gold bullets on his contract victims. To nobody’s surprise, Lee has the solar energy apparatus installed on his Hong Kong area island hideaway. Bond naturally conquers all obstacles, and finds some fadeout sack time for Britt Ekland, the local British intelligence charmer.

The Man with the Golden Gun

UK

Production

United Artists/Eon. Director Guy Hamilton; Producer Albert R. Broccoli, Harry Saltzman; Screenplay Richard Maibaum, Tom Mankiewicz; Camera Ted Moore, Oswald Morris; Editor John Shirley, Raymond Poulton; Music John Barry; Art Director Peter Murton

Crew

(Color) Widescreen. Available on VHS, DVD. Extract of a review from 1974. Running time: 123 MIN.

With

Roger Moore Christopher Lee Britt Ekland Maud Adams Herve Villechaize Clifton James
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