Review: ‘Lacombe Lucien’

Director Louis Malle's film looks at a young farm boy, 17, who drifts into the French Gestapo by ignorance rather than intent. Pic displays the banality of evil and refrains from didactics or heroics.

Director Louis Malle’s film looks at a young farm boy, 17, who drifts into the French Gestapo by ignorance rather than intent. Pic displays the banality of evil and refrains from didactics or heroics.

Lucien Lacombe, played with a remarkable flair by non-actor Pierre Blaise, works at a hospital. His father is a prisoner of war. He at first wants to join the resistance (it is 1944) but is refused and, when inadvertently out after curfew, is dragged into the local French Gestapo quarters. He is made drunk and gives away the head of the resistance.

He takes pride in it, while seemingly unaffected by the torture, decadence and hysteria he sees around him as the Americans approach. Meeting a Jewish family holed up in the town, he is taken by the daughter and a sort of love affair blooms. The father, an ex-Paris tailor, cannot bring himself to hate this young semi-thug who moves in on them.

Pic is expertly directed and acted, with Aurore Clement as the fragile girl and Holger Lowenadler as her father also outstanding, as is the fine lensing that helps capture the period.

Lacombe Lucien

France - Italy - W. Germany

Production

NEF/UPF/Vides/Halleluja. Director Louis Malle; Producer Claude Nedjar; Screenplay Louis Malle, Patrick Modiano; Camera Tonino Delli Colli; Editor Suzanne Baron; Art Director Ghislain Uhry

Crew

(Color) Extract of a review from 1974. Running time: 136 MIN.

With

Pierre Blaise Aurore Clement Holger Lowenadler Therese Giehse Stephane Bouy Loumi Iacobesco
Want to read more articles like this one? SUBSCRIBE TO VARIETY TODAY.
Post A Comment 0

Leave a Reply

No Comments

Comments are moderated. They may be edited for clarity and reprinting in whole or in part in Variety publications.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

More Film News from Variety

Loading