Review: ‘Scarecrow’

Scarecrow is a periodically interesting but ultimately unsatisfying character study of two modern drifters. Gene Hackman is excellent as a paroled crook with determined plans for the future, but Al Pacino is shot down by the script which never provides him with much beyond freaky second-banana status.

Scarecrow is a periodically interesting but ultimately unsatisfying character study of two modern drifters. Gene Hackman is excellent as a paroled crook with determined plans for the future, but Al Pacino is shot down by the script which never provides him with much beyond freaky second-banana status.

Script seems an attempt to update Runyonesque characters and situations to the seamy 1970s.

Hackman and Pacino meet in the California countryside. The former is gruff, eccentric, crude and volatile. The latter is likeable, weak, but sufficiently put together to return to Detroit to the wife and child he abandoned years earlier.

In their travels, pair encounter several extremely well-cast and most effective characters.

Scarecrow

Production

Warner. Director Jerry Schatzberg; Producer Robert M. Sherman; Screenplay Garry Michael White; Camera Vilmos Zsigmond; Editor Evan Lottman; Music Fred Myrow; Art Director Al Brenner

Crew

(Color) Widescreen. Available on VHS. Extract of a review from 1973. Running time: 112 MIN.

With

Gene Hackman Al Pacino Dorothy Tristan Ann Wedgeworth Richard Lynch Eileen Brennan

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