Review: ‘Now You See Him, Now You Don’t’

Virtually all the key creative elements which early in 1970 made The Computer Wore Tennis Shoes encore superbly in Now You See Him, Now You Don't [from a story by Robert L. King]. Discovery of a fluid which makes people and objects invisible provides the inventive plot peg for uproarious golf games and car chase sequences involving students, professors, police and criminals.

Virtually all the key creative elements which early in 1970 made The Computer Wore Tennis Shoes encore superbly in Now You See Him, Now You Don’t [from a story by Robert L. King]. Discovery of a fluid which makes people and objects invisible provides the inventive plot peg for uproarious golf games and car chase sequences involving students, professors, police and criminals.

Encoring players include Kurt Russell, this time as a college student who accidentally discovers the invisible potion, Michael McGreevey as his sidekick, Joe Flynn as a befuddled dean, Cesar Romero as a local gangster who plans to foreclose on the school to make it a gambling casino-hotel, and Richard Bakalyan as Romero’s right-hand flunkie.

Flynn’s camping is a major comedy prop as the story develops. To raise mortgage money, he enters a golf game with philanthropist Jim Backus, and aided by the invisible students scores many holes-in-one and a host of laughs. Romero later steals the magic fluid to rob a bank, cueing a climactic car chase which comes across with spectacularly funny impact.

Now You See Him, Now You Don't

Production

Walt Disney. Director Robert Butler; Producer Ron Miller; Screenplay Joseph L. McEveety; Camera Frank Phillips; Editor Cotton Warburton; Music Robert F. Brunner; Art Director John B. Mansbridge, Walter Tyler

Crew

(Color) Available on VHS. Extract of a review from 1972. Running time: 88 MIN.

With

Kurt Russell Cesar Romero Joe Flynn Jim Backus William Windom Michael McGreevey
Want to read more articles like this one? SUBSCRIBE TO VARIETY TODAY.
Post A Comment 0

Leave a Reply

No Comments

Comments are moderated. They may be edited for clarity and reprinting in whole or in part in Variety publications.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

More Film News from Variety

Loading