Review: ‘King, Queen, Knave’

Polski director Jerzy Skolimowski, working in Germany, brings off an intermittently funny black comedy on first love, avariciousness and, underneath, a subversive look at economic booms and human relations in the upper classes.

Polski director Jerzy Skolimowski, working in Germany, brings off an intermittently funny black comedy on first love, avariciousness and, underneath, a subversive look at economic booms and human relations in the upper classes.

Based on Vladimir Nabokov’s pithy novel, its obvious tricky word play, ironic nostalgia and interplay of love, are hard to duplicate on film. Skolimowski wisely concentrates on making it as visual as possible. It does not work, for the characters are not well blocked out and the humor is oblique, but present enough for some yoks.

A gauche young orphan is invited, by an uncle he has never seen, to Germany. The blundering boy likes his easygoing uncle, David Niven, but is smitten by his sexy aunt Gina Lollobrigida who first decides to seduce the boy and then have him kill her husband to inherit the fortune.

King, Queen, Knave

W. Germany - US

Production

Maran/Wolper. Director Jerzy Skolimowski; Producer Lutz Hengst; Screenplay David Seltzer, David Shaw; Camera Charly Steinberger; Editor Mel Shapiro; Music Stanley Myers; Art Director Rolf Zehetbauer

Crew

(Color) Available on VHS. Extract of a review from 1972. Running time: 92 MIN.

With

David Niven Gina Lollobrigida John Moulder Brown Mario Adorf Carl Fox-Duering Christopher Sandford
Want to read more articles like this one? SUBSCRIBE TO VARIETY TODAY.
Post A Comment 0

Leave a Reply

No Comments

Comments are moderated. They may be edited for clarity and reprinting in whole or in part in Variety publications.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

More Film News from Variety

Loading