Review: ‘Zeppelin’

Zeppelin settles for being just another wartime melodrama, with some good aerial sequences and a powerful, brisk raid sequence in the finale.

Zeppelin settles for being just another wartime melodrama, with some good aerial sequences and a powerful, brisk raid sequence in the finale.

Story [by producer Owen Crump] deals with Britain’s concern about German’s new World War I weapon, the Zeppelin, the monstrous, looming aircraft that made Britain vulnerable. Indication that the Germans have perfected a new and even more effective Zeppelin jerks the British highups into swift action.

A young Scottish lieutenant, of Anglo-German parentage, who had left Germany and eventually joined the British Army (Michael York) looks the perfect spy. Worked on by an attractive German Mata Hari (Alexandra Stewart), he is softened up and when called on to ‘volunteer’ to ‘defect’ to the Germans and dig out the secrets of the new Zeppelin he reluctantly agrees.

Many Germans are suspicious of his sudden switch back to the homeland. But only one appears to be convinced that he’s a spy. She (Elke Sommer) is the wife of the aircraft designer (Marius Goring) and she’s more concerned with helping to prepare the Zepp for its final trial run than in exposing York.

Zeppelin

UK - US

Production

Getty & Fromkess/Warner. Director Etienne Perier; Producer Owen Crump; Screenplay Arthur Rowe, Donald Churchill; Camera Alan Hume; Editor John Shirley; Music Roy Budd; Art Director Bert Davey

Crew

(Color) Widescreen. Available on VHS. Extract of a review from 1971. Running time: 97 MIN.

With

Michael York Elke Sommer Peter Carsten Marius Goring Anton Diffring Andrew Keir
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