Review: ‘Wuthering Heights’

Wuthering Heights is a competent, tasteful, frequently even lovely re-adaption of Emily Bronte's Gothic, mystical love story. But the brooding tension, the electric passion of two lovers compelled to an inevitable tragedy is not generated.

Wuthering Heights is a competent, tasteful, frequently even lovely re-adaption of Emily Bronte’s Gothic, mystical love story. But the brooding tension, the electric passion of two lovers compelled to an inevitable tragedy is not generated.

Anna Calder-Marshall as Catherine is quite good, giving the role a wild young animal look and spirit. Timothy Dalton is also a technically capable actor, with a dark gypsy brooding look that is appropriate for Heathcliff. But his sullen, almost sulking portrayal is often that of a hurt boy rather than a man seething with resentment and a frustrated passion, a powder keg ready to explode.

Director Robert Fuest and cameraman John Coquillon compose striking and beautiful pictures, but without creating the sort of mood and tension the film needs.

Wuthering Heights

UK - US

Production

American International. Director Robert Fuest; Producer James H. Nicholson, Samuel Z. Arkoff; Screenplay Patrick Tilley; Camera John Coquillon; Editor Ann Chegwidden; Music Michel Legrand; Art Director Philip Harrison

Crew

(Color) Available on VHS. Extract of a review from 1971. Running time: 105 MIN.

With

Anna Calder-Marshall Timothy Dalton Julian Glover Ian Ogilvy Hilary Dwyer Judy Cornwell
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