Review: ‘The Raging Moon’

The Raging Moon is a tender love story [from a novel by Peter Marshall] woven round a delicate situation, but it has some good tangy dialog and some funny situations.

The Raging Moon is a tender love story [from a novel by Peter Marshall] woven round a delicate situation, but it has some good tangy dialog and some funny situations.

Early situations are broad and a bit bawdy but purpose is to establish the rough-and-ready character of the young hero (a bit of a yobbo, though with a yearning to write) and his background. He’s a carefree boy with the birds, crazy about football and with little respect for his elders. Injured in a football match he loses the use of his legs. He lands up in a home for cripples. He’s surly, resentful and a pain to the rest of the inmates who’ve learned to live with their misfortune.

But at the home he meets and falls in love with a girl who has been wheelchaired for six years. Slowly, their relationship blossoms.

Bryan Forbes’ dialog is punchy, perceptive and very understanding of human problems. He has also worked up an excellent cast. Malcolm McDowell handles the two or three facets of the hero with strong facility. Nanette Newman has a stunning warmth and radiance that communicates.

The Raging Moon

UK

Production

M-G-M/EMI. Director Bryan Forbes; Producer Bruce Cohn Curtis; Screenplay Bryan Forbes; Camera Tony Imi; Editor Timothy Gee; Music Stanley Myers; Art Director Robert Jones

Crew

(Color) Available on VHS. Extract of a review from 1971. Running time: 110 MIN.

With

Malcolm McDowell Nanette Newman Georgia Brown Bernard Lee Gerald Sim Michael Flanders
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