Review: ‘The Go-Between’

In its glimpse of the manners and mores of the British socialites at the beginning of the century, The Go-Between is both fascinating and charming. Joseph Losey's direction sets a pace in which incident and characterization take precedence over action.

In its glimpse of the manners and mores of the British socialites at the beginning of the century, The Go-Between is both fascinating and charming. Joseph Losey’s direction sets a pace in which incident and characterization take precedence over action.

The Harold Pinter screenplay, based on the L.P. Hartley novel, is, as one would naturally expect, literate and penetrating, yet there are certain obscurities in the treatment.

It is Michael Redgrave looking back at a definitive event of his boyhood, an experience which undoubtedly was largely responsible for his remaining unmarried. For it is during the long hot summer in the lavish country home that the youngster becomes emotionally involved by acting as the contact (or go-between) between the daughter of the house – with whom he believes himself to be in love – and the tenant farmer, although the girl is already betrothed to a member of the aristocracy. And it is in that period that the boy gets his first inkling of what sex is all about.

Though Julie Christie and Alan Bates are starred as the girl and the farmer, it is the boy who has the pivotal role, and Dominic Guard, a screen newcomer, appears to play his part effortlessly, with an absence of precociousness.

1971: Nomination: Best Supp. Actress (Margaret Leighton)

The Go-Between

UK

Production

EMI. Director Joseph Losey; Producer John Heyman, Norman Priggen; Screenplay Harold Pinter; Camera Gerry Fisher; Editor Reginald Beck; Music Michel Legrand; Art Director Carmen Dillon

Crew

(Color) Available on VHS, DVD. Extract of a review from 1971. Running time: 118 MIN.

With

Julie Christie Alan Bates Margaret Leighton Michael Redgrave Michael Gough Edward Fox
Want to read more articles like this one? SUBSCRIBE TO VARIETY TODAY.
Post A Comment 0

Leave a Reply

No Comments

Comments are moderated. They may be edited for clarity and reprinting in whole or in part in Variety publications.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

More Film News from Variety

Loading