Review: ‘Szerelem’

In a firm classical mold, yet with a fragmented flair in construction, director Karoly Makk has worked out a touching but never sentimental tale of three people, set in 1953, when there was some attempt to throw off the Stalinist yoke [in Hungary].

In a firm classical mold, yet with a fragmented flair in construction, director Karoly Makk has worked out a touching but never sentimental tale of three people, set in 1953, when there was some attempt to throw off the Stalinist yoke [in Hungary].

Lili Darvas, widow of playwright Ferenc Molnar, who has lived in the US for 30 years, was called back by Makk to play the dying octagenarian mother. It is a stroke of perfect casting.

Enthroned in an old house, she is demanding without being shrewish or senile. She accepts the whopping letters of her son (Ivan Darvas) making a film in America and other outlandish things her daughter-in-law (Mari Torocsik) cooks up. Whether she ever suspects anything is left ambiguous.

Torocsik’s only fragments of the past are the arrest of her husband, in prison for political matters. He is suddenly freed and comes home, during the aftermath of the death of Stalin.

Written by a leading Magyar writer, Tibor Dery [from his two short stories, Two Women and Love], this intense, subtly atmospheric film has literary insights that are well worked into a visual pattern by Makk, all handled with poise, pace and balance.

Szerelem

Hungary

Production

Mafilm 1. Director Karoly Makk; Producer Peter Bacso; Screenplay Tibor Dery; Camera Janos Toth; Editor Gyorgy Sivo; Music Andras Mihaly; Art Director Jozsef Romvari

Crew

(B&W) Extract of a review from 1971. Running time: 92 MIN.

With

Lili Darvas Mari Torocsik Ivan Darvas Tibor Bitskey Eszter Szakacs Erzsi Orsolya
Want to read more articles like this one? SUBSCRIBE TO VARIETY TODAY.
Post A Comment 0

Leave a Reply

No Comments

Comments are moderated. They may be edited for clarity and reprinting in whole or in part in Variety publications.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

More Film News from Variety

Loading