Director Jack Nicholson seems here to be making a sort of games-people-play charade which takes off on many of the would-be commitments of his characters.

Director Jack Nicholson seems here to be making a sort of games-people-play charade which takes off on many of the would-be commitments of his characters.

William Tepper, as the central sports star character of the campus convolutions, reflects the changes and protest surrounding his simplistic existence.

His roommate (Michael Margotta), a Che-like student revolutionary, wants to destroy all for he feels the draft, life around him, the war, will destroy him. Margotta leads a gag raid on a basketball game with guerrilla-clad friends that puts them all in custody, but later they are freed. He beats the draft by playing mad in a raucous induction physical scene, but winds up going mad for real, trying to kill his roommate’s woman, who he feels is simply a lech.

Karen Black is the sensual older woman, who sexually grapples with the basketball hero but finally resents being used and tries to claim a personality of her own.

Nicholson deftly illustrates the background cynicism of big time sports against the more obvious cynicism of college life.

Drive, He Said

Production

BBS. Director Jack Nicholson; Producer Jack Nicholson, Steve Blauner, Bert Schneider; Screenplay Jack Nicholson, Jeremy Larner; Camera Bill Butler; Editor Pat Somerset, Donn Cambern, Christopher Holmes, Robert L. Wolfe; Music David Shire; Art Director Harry Gittes

Crew

(Color) Extract of a review from 1971. Running time: 95 MIN.

With

William Tepper Karen Black Michael Margotta Bruce Dern Robert Towne Henry Jaglom
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