Review: ‘The Computer Wore Tennis Shoes’

The amusing premise of The Computer Wore Tennis Shoes is that of a college non-student who, via an electrical accident, becomes brilliant because a computer memory bank has been transferred into his brain. Good looking production is above average family entertainment, enhanced to great measure by zesty, but never show-off, direction by Robert Butler, in a debut swing to pix from telefilm.

The amusing premise of The Computer Wore Tennis Shoes is that of a college non-student who, via an electrical accident, becomes brilliant because a computer memory bank has been transferred into his brain. Good looking production is above average family entertainment, enhanced to great measure by zesty, but never show-off, direction by Robert Butler, in a debut swing to pix from telefilm.

Surrounding Kurt Russell, playing the suddenly-smart student, is a most adroitly selected group of superior character actors. Joe Flynn as the college dean; William Schallert as Russell’s prof; Alan Hewitt, dean of a competing college who goes after Russell with a recruiting vengence when the kid’s fame spreads to a TV show hosted by Pat Harrington.

Also, Cesar Romero, with assistant Richard Bakalyan, provide the major story support: supposedly honest Romero, in reality a computer-oriented crime boss, has given Russell’s school his old computer. And in the accident to the youth, Romero’s clandestine records are inadvertently revealed.

The Computer Wore Tennis Shoes

Production

Walt Disney. Director Robert Butler; Producer Bill Anderson; Screenplay Joseph L. McEveety; Camera Frank Phillips; Editor Cotton Warburton; Music Robert F. Brunner;; Art Director John B. Mansbridge

Crew

(Color) Available on VHS. Extract of a review from 1970. Running time: 90 MIN.

With

Kurt Russell Cesar Romero Joe Flynn William Schallert Alan Hewitt Richard Bakalyan
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