Review: ‘The Ballad of Cable Hogue’

The Ballad of Cable Hogue is a Damon Runyon-esque oater comedy from Sam Peckinpah.

The Ballad of Cable Hogue is a Damon Runyon-esque oater comedy from Sam Peckinpah.

Jason Robards is the title character, a charming desert rat; Stella Stevens is the cow-town harlot with the heart of gold; and David Warner is a preacher of sorts.

Robards is a grizzled prospector left to die in the desert wastes by Strother Martin and L.Q. Jones, two bumbling villains. Robards instead finds water where nobody ever had, and prospers as a rest-stop owner on a stage route owned by R.G. Armstrong, where Slim Pickens and Max Evans are the carriage drivers. Stevens becomes Robards’ big romance, but exits for Frisco on her gold-digging hunt. Characterizations are fully developed.

The Ballad of Cable Hogue

Production

Warner. Director Sam Peckinpah; Producer Sam Peckinpah; Screenplay John Crawford, Edmund Penney; Camera Lucien Ballard; Editor Frank Santillo, Lou Lombardo; Music Jerry Goldsmith; Art Director Leroy Coleman

Crew

(Color) Available on VHS, DVD. Extract of a review from 1970. Running time: 121 MIN.

With

Jason Robards Stella Stevens David Warner Strother Martin Slim Pickens L.Q. Jones
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