Old Tarzans don't disappear, they just end up in later Tarzan pix as villains. At least, that's the jump Jock Mahoney made from 1962's Tarzan Goes to India to this patchwork of three TV shows, in which he plays a jungle dictator. Although no longer the lead, Mahoney nabs pic's best line - and heartiest laugh. As efforts fail to rescue a cohort sinking fast in quicksand, he shouts, 'Chico, get out of there.'

Old Tarzans don’t disappear, they just end up in later Tarzan pix as villains. At least, that’s the jump Jock Mahoney made from 1962’s Tarzan Goes to India to this patchwork of three TV shows, in which he plays a jungle dictator. Although no longer the lead, Mahoney nabs pic’s best line – and heartiest laugh. As efforts fail to rescue a cohort sinking fast in quicksand, he shouts, ‘Chico, get out of there.’

Excepting that bright moment, film (second of such tube adaptations, other being Tarzan’s Jungle Rebellion) painfully corroborates just how drab TV techniques can be when subjected to the concentration level of a theatre. Every action or piece of dialog is redundantly reiterated (broadcast style) as the grenade-deafened apeman (Ron Ely) attempts escape from the evil ‘Colonel’ (Mahoney) plus accomplice or two.

Area is a patch of jungle apparently no larger than Central Park Zoo. No wonder, as the cliche-bound script explains, Tarzan ‘knows this jungle like the back of his hand.’

Tarzan's Deadly Silence

Production

Director Robert L. Friend; Producer Leon Benson; Screenplay Lee Edwin, Jack A. Robinson, John Considine, Tim Considine; Camera Abraham Vialla; Editor Gabriel Torres; Music Walter Greene

Crew

(Color) Extract of a review from 1970. Running time: 88 MIN.

With

Ron Ely Jock Mahoney Woody Strode Manuel Padilla Jr Gregorio Acosta Nichelle Nichols)
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