The Stalking Moon seemingly was meant to be a chilling suspenser, framed in a western environment. It does not achieve this goal, because of clumsy plot structuring and dialog and limp direction, which produces tedious pacing.

The Stalking Moon seemingly was meant to be a chilling suspenser, framed in a western environment. It does not achieve this goal, because of clumsy plot structuring and dialog and limp direction, which produces tedious pacing.

Theodore V. Olsen’s novel, scripted by Alvin Sargent, has Gregory Peck retiring as a vet Indian scout with the US Army. In an Indian round-up, Eva Marie Saint appears, with son Noland Clay. Years before, she was kidnapped and impressed into squaw service by Nathaniel Narcisco. Peck takes her and the boy to his retirement ranch, but the Indian brave stalks them.

Forgetting the oater atmosphere (which is supposed to be secondary) film doesn’t cut it as a suspenser. Saint, although perhaps as stolid as a frightened Indian slave-woman might be, is not able to project her determined flight from the range territory.

Kid Clay just stares at everything. Dialog is spare and vapid.

The Stalking Moon

Production

National General/Stalking Moon. Director Robert Mulligan; Producer Alan J. Pakula; Screenplay Alvin Sargent; Camera Charles Lang; Editor Aaron Stell; Music Fred Karlin; Art Director Roland Anderson, Jack Poplin

Crew

(Color) Widescreen. Available on VHS. Extract of a review from 1969. Running time: 109 MIN.

With

Gregory Peck Eva Marie Saint Robert Forster Noland Clay
Want Entertainment News First? Sign up for Variety Alerts and Newsletters!
Post A Comment 0