Frank D. Gilroy's Pulitzer Prize legit drama of 1964 has been translated to the screen in an outstanding way by original producer Edgar Lansbury and stager Ulu Grosbard, all three making an impressive debut in films. Joining original stars Jack Albertson and Martin Sheen is Patricia Neal, in a triumphant return to pix after near-fatal illness.

Frank D. Gilroy’s Pulitzer Prize legit drama of 1964 has been translated to the screen in an outstanding way by original producer Edgar Lansbury and stager Ulu Grosbard, all three making an impressive debut in films. Joining original stars Jack Albertson and Martin Sheen is Patricia Neal, in a triumphant return to pix after near-fatal illness.

An intimate, poignant and telling drama of a young World War II vet, returning to an unhappy home, film is superior in all departments. Neal and Albertson are outstanding as a married Bronx-Irish couple who, while not happy and loving, are not unloving either. Albertson, whose rising business star fell in the Depression, and Neal, whose over-dependence on her unseen mother is a sore point with Albertson, have struggled along for years.

Return from war of only son Sheen brings the festering crisis to a head, partly by a title-inspiring gift of flowers which releases pent up emotions.

The terrific writing, which top-notch performances make more magnificent, displays a wide range of human emotions, without recourse to cheap sensationalism or dialog. Grosbard’s perceptive direction keeps the bickering and banter from becoming shrill histrionics.

The Subject Was Roses

Production

M-G-M. Director Ulu Grosbard; Producer Edgar Lansbury; Screenplay Frank D. Gilroy; Camera Jack Priestley; Editor Jerry Greenberg; Music Lee Pockriss; Art Director George Jenkins

Crew

(Color) Available on VHS. Extract of a review from 1968. Running time: 107 MIN.

With

Patricia Neal Jack Albertson Martin Sheen Don Saxon Elaine Williams
Want Entertainment News First? Sign up for Variety Alerts and Newsletters!
Post A Comment 0