All the charm of two-reel comedy, as well as all the resulting tedium when the concept is distended to 10 reels, is evident in The Party.

All the charm of two-reel comedy, as well as all the resulting tedium when the concept is distended to 10 reels, is evident in The Party.

The one-joke script, told in laudable, if unsuccessful, attempt to emulate silent pix technique, is dotted with comedy ranging from drawing-room repartee to literally, bathroom vulgarity.

Peter Sellers is a disaster-prone foreign thesp, who, in an amusing eight-minute prolog to titles, fouls up an important Bengal Lancer-type film location. His outraged producer (Gavin MacLeod) blackballs him to studio chief J. Edward McKinley, but, in a mixup, Sellers gets invited to a party at McKinley’s home.

Production designer Fernando Carrere has done an outstanding job in creating, on the one set used, a super-gauge house of sliding floors, pools, centralized controls and bizarre trappings.

Besides Sellers, most prominent thesps are Claudine Longet, the romantic interest, and Steve Franken as a tipsy butler. Eventually it all becomes a big yawn.

The Party

Production

United Artists. Director Blake Edwards; Producer Blake Edwards; Screenplay Blake Edwards, Tom Waldman, Frank Waldman; Camera Lucien Ballard; Editor Ralph Winters; Music Henry Mancini; Art Director Fernando Carrere

Crew

(Color) Widescreen. Available on VHS, DVD. Extract of a review from 1968. Running time: 98 MIN.

With

Peter Sellers Claudine Longet Marge Champion Steve Franken Fay McKenzie
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