Hardhitting action compensates for certain confusing story elements, and plottage is sufficiently exciting and suspenseful to maintain interest. For pictorial values, there's the beauty of an Acapulco location.

Hardhitting action compensates for certain confusing story elements, and plottage is sufficiently exciting and suspenseful to maintain interest. For pictorial values, there’s the beauty of an Acapulco location.

Direction by Brian G. Hutton is a potent assist to film’s unfoldment, in which David McCallum takes on the Mafia and drug smuggling across the Mexican border. Hutton, who draws strong performances from entire cast, specializes here in legitimately-premised violence and hits a torrid pace.

Hall Bartlett as producer has dumped a flock of attractive physical values into the adaptation of Robert Wilder’s novel, Fruit of the Poppy, and has smartly packaged the overall for a good audience feature.

McCallum makes a good impression and gets handsome support from Stella Stevens as the former girl friend, Telly Savalas as a heroin pusher, Ricardo Montalban as an Acapulco contact and Rip Torn, Mafia leader. Savalas is a particular standout.

Sol Madrid

Production

M-G-M. Director Brian G. Hutton; Producer Hall Bartlett; Screenplay David Karp; Camera Fred Koenekamp; Editor John McSweeney; Music Lalo Schifrin; Art Director George W. Davis, Carl Anderson

Crew

(Color) Widescreen. Extract of a review from 1968. Running time: 90 MIN.

With

David McCallum Stella Stevens Telly Savalas Rip Torn Pat Hingle Ricardo Montalban
Follow @Variety on Twitter for breaking news, reviews and more