Several exhilarating milestones are achieved in Rosemary's Baby, an excellent film version of Ira Levin's diabolical chiller novel. Writer-director Roman Polanski has triumphed in his first US-made pic. The film holds attention without explicit violence or gore.

Several exhilarating milestones are achieved in Rosemary’s Baby, an excellent film version of Ira Levin’s diabolical chiller novel. Writer-director Roman Polanski has triumphed in his first US-made pic. The film holds attention without explicit violence or gore.

Mia Farrow and John Cassavetes, a likeable young married couple, take a flat in a rundown New York building. Ralph Bellamy, an obstetrician prescribing some strange pre-natal nourishment for Farrow and Maurice Evans, Farrow’s sole ally, who dies a mysterious death, as well as Charles Grodin, enter the plot at adroit intervals.

The near-climax – Farrow has been drugged so as to conceive by Satan – and the final wallop make for genuine cliff hanger interest.

Farrow’s performance is outstanding. Cassavetes handles particularly well the difficult projection of a husband as much in love with his wife as with success. Neighbour Ruth Gordon is pleasantly unrestrained in her pushy self-interest, quite appropriate herein, while other principals score solidly.

1968: Best Supp. Actress (Ruth Gordon)

Nomination: Best Adapted Screenplay

Rosemary's Baby

Production

Paramount. Director Roman Polanski; Producer William Castle; Screenplay Roman Polanski; Camera William Fraker; Editor Sam O'Steen, Bob Wyman; Music Christopher Komeda; Art Director Richard Sylbert

Crew

(Color) Available on VHS, DVD. Extract of a review from 1968. Running time: 134 MIN.

With

Mia Farrow John Cassavetes Ruth Gordon Sidney Blackmer Maurice Evans Ralph Bellamy

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