Entertaining suspense film neatly laced with mordant humor. Stronger, more appropriate direction could have pushed the film into the category of minor classic.

Entertaining suspense film neatly laced with mordant humor. Stronger, more appropriate direction could have pushed the film into the category of minor classic.

Plotline casts Rod Steiger as a psychotic theatrical entrepreneur who takes to strangling drab middle-aged women as a means of working out his hangups over his dead mother. He employs a variety of disguises, accents and mannerisms for each murder.

Steiger relishes the multiple aspect of his part, and audiences should equally relish his droll impersonations of an Irish priest, German handyman, Jewish cop, middle-aged woman, Italian waiter and homosexual hairdresser.

Assigned to capture the lunatic ladykiller is a mother-smothered cop, played to perfection by George Segal.

With an excellent cast and a very good screenplay, No Way to Treat a Lady comes close to the quality of the best British films of the 1950s.

No Way to Treat a Lady

Production

Paramount. Director Jack Smight; Producer Sol C. Siegel; Screenplay John Gay; Camera Jack Priestley; Editor Archie Marshek; Music Stanley Myers; Art Director Hal Pereira, George Jenkins

Crew

(Color) Available on VHS. Extract of a review from 1968. Running time: 108 MIN.

With

Rod Steiger Lee Remick George Segal Eileen Heckart Murray Hamilton Michael Dunn
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