Ivy is at bottom an innocuous romantic comedy, not unlike those cranked out regularly in the 1940s, without sufficiently high-powered drama, clever humor or moving romance to offer. What little force the pic has stems from Sidney Poitier's clear enjoyment of a role cut from Cary Grant cloth.

Ivy is at bottom an innocuous romantic comedy, not unlike those cranked out regularly in the 1940s, without sufficiently high-powered drama, clever humor or moving romance to offer. What little force the pic has stems from Sidney Poitier’s clear enjoyment of a role cut from Cary Grant cloth.

Simple storyline provided by Poitier is not rich in character motivation. He plays a lovable rogue who runs a (literally) floating crap game in the van of a truck, a gambling ploy that will probably strike even the most inveterate New York gamblers as doubtfully authentic.

Prodded by two teenagers into dating their late-20s maid (Abby Lincoln), who has threatened to abandon their household to the stupefying incompetence of their mother, he gradually falls in love.

Lincoln has a spirited freshness and supporting cast all performs diligently.

1968: Nomination: Best Song (‘For the Love of Ivy’)

For Love of Ivy

Production

Palomar. Director Daniel Mann; Producer Edgar J. Scherick, Jay Weston; Screenplay Robert Alan Aurthur; Camera Joseph Coffey; Editor Patricia Jaffe; Music Quincy Jones; Art Director Peter Dohanos

Crew

(Color) Available on VHS. Extract of a review from 1968. Running time: 101 MIN.

With

Sidney Poitier Abby Lincoln Beau Bridges Nan Martin Lauri Peters Carroll O'Connor
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