Blithely, as if it were as natural a romantic yarn as would appear in a popular magazine, the synopsis of Andy Warhol's opus reads: 'The story of a young married couple and the efforts of the husband, Joe, to sell himself to earn money for his wife's girl friend's abortion.'

Blithely, as if it were as natural a romantic yarn as would appear in a popular magazine, the synopsis of Andy Warhol’s opus reads: ‘The story of a young married couple and the efforts of the husband, Joe, to sell himself to earn money for his wife’s girl friend’s abortion.’

Paul Morrissey wrote, directed and lensed this hapless erotica freakout as Warhol was recuperating from gunshot wounds inflicted by Gloria Solanis. Morrisey’s efforts, true to the master, are pedestrian in both form and content, but much worse is the technical amateurishness with camera and sound.

Half sentences are abundant. But it probably doesn’t matter to any great extent since the wild sound recorded during the action bounces off the walls, rendering most interchanges between characters largely incoherent.

The principal character Joe concerns himself mainly with floating from one homosexual encounter to the next in order to make the required coin, sporting an abundance of frontal nudity. The anti-climax comes when Joe finds his wife in bed with her girlfriend.

Flesh

Production

Warhol. Director Paul Morrissey; Producer Andy Warhol; Screenplay Paul Morrissey; Camera Paul Morrissey

Crew

(Color) Extract of a review from 1968. Running time: 105 MIN.

With

Joe Dallesandro Geraldine Smith John Christian Maurice Bardell Candy Darling Patti D'Arbanville
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