Based on the Congo uprising, this is a raw adventure yarn (from a novel by Wilbur Smith) with some glib philosophizing which skates superficially over the points of view of the cynical mercenaries and the patriotic Congolese.

Based on the Congo uprising, this is a raw adventure yarn (from a novel by Wilbur Smith) with some glib philosophizing which skates superficially over the points of view of the cynical mercenaries and the patriotic Congolese.

Rod Taylor plays a hardbitten mercenary major who’s prepared to sweat through any task, however dirty, providing his fee is okay. He’s assigned by Congo’s president to take a train through rebel Simba-held country and bring back fugitives and a load of uncut diamonds stashed away in a beleaguered town.

The action is taken care of effectively but the rapport between some of the characters is rarely smooth nor convincing enough. Pic was filmed in Africa and at Metro’s British studios.

Acting is mostly of a straightforward nature for the script does not lend itself to a subtlety of characterization. Taylor makes a robust hero while Jim Brown brings some dignity and interest to the role of the Congolese native.

Dark of the Sun

Production

M-G-M. Director Jack Cardiff; Producer George Englund; Screenplay Quentin Werty, Adrian Spies; Camera Ted Scaife; Editor Ernest Walter; Music Jacques Loussier; Art Director Elliot Scott

Crew

(Color) Widescreen. Extract of a review from 1968. Running time: 106 MIN.

With

Rod Taylor Yvette Mimieux Peter Carsten Jim Brown Kenneth More Andre Morell
Follow @Variety on Twitter for breaking news, reviews and more