Plot meanders between New England country girl Barbara Parkins, who comes to the big city and eventually is seduced by urban social patterns; Patty Duke, rising young singing star who gets hung up on pills, and Sharon Tate, playing a big-breasted, untalented, but basically sensitive girl who never finds happiness. Parkins and Tate, the latter particularly good, suffer from under-emphasis in early reels, and corny plot resolution.

Plot meanders between New England country girl Barbara Parkins, who comes to the big city and eventually is seduced by urban social patterns; Patty Duke, rising young singing star who gets hung up on pills, and Sharon Tate, playing a big-breasted, untalented, but basically sensitive girl who never finds happiness. Parkins and Tate, the latter particularly good, suffer from under-emphasis in early reels, and corny plot resolution.

Main body of the story [from Jacqueline Susann’s novel] concerns the rise, plateau and erratic performance of Duke’s character. For her, this is a very good role.

Susan Hayward, who replaced Judy Garland in cast, does an excellent job in giving acting depth to the role of the older legit star, ever alert to remove threats to her supremacy.

Five songs, including title theme, by Andre and Dory Previn are interpolated nicely, and logically, into plot. Dionne Warwick regularly warbles title tune.

1967: Nomination: Best Adapted Music Score

Valley of the Dolls

Production

20th Century-Fox/Red Lion. Director Mark Robson; Producer David Weisbart; Screenplay Helen Deutsch, Dorothy Kingsley; Camera William H. Daniels; Editor Dorothy Spencer; Music John Williams; Art Director Jack Martin Smith, Richard Day

Crew

(Color) Widescreen. Available on VHS, DVD. Extract of a review from 1967. Running time: 123 MIN.

With

Barbara Parkins Patty Duke Paul Burke Sharon Tate Tony Scotti Susan Hayward
Want Entertainment News First? Sign up for Variety Alerts and Newsletters!
Post A Comment 0