Review: ‘The Trip’

Jack Nicholson script opens with Peter Fonda, a director of TV commercials, shooting on a beach and being confronted by wife, Susan Strasberg, who is about to divorce him. Distressed by his personal life, he goes off with friend Bruce Dern to the hippie, weirdly-painted house of a pusher, played by Dennis Hopper, to buy LSD.

Jack Nicholson script opens with Peter Fonda, a director of TV commercials, shooting on a beach and being confronted by wife, Susan Strasberg, who is about to divorce him. Distressed by his personal life, he goes off with friend Bruce Dern to the hippie, weirdly-painted house of a pusher, played by Dennis Hopper, to buy LSD.

Guarded by Dern, Fonda’s trip begins. Scenes rapidly cut from Fonda climbing lofty sand dunes, being chased by two black hooded horsemen through forests, as well as being the sacrificial victim at a dark medieval rite in a torchlit cave. Unconnected scenes begin to spin off the screen with increasing speed and with no attempt at explanation.

Fonda comes across very well, establishing the various moods needed to further the visual effects. Strasberg is on only briefly, and Hopper is okay, except in a dream sequence in which he plays a weirdo high priest, but that whole scene is sophomoric.

The Trip

Production

American International. Director Roger Corman; Producer Roger Corman; Screenplay Jack Nicholson; Camera Arch Dalzell; Editor Ronald Sinclair; Music Electric Flag

Crew

(Color) Available on VHS. Extract of a review from 1967. Running time: 85 MIN.

With

Peter Fonda Susan Strasberg Bruce Dern Dennis Hopper Salli Sachse Katherine Walsh
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