Review: ‘The King’s Pirate’

Madagascar, circa 1700, backdrops the screenplay [from a story by coscripter Aeneas MacKenzie] which twirls around efforts of the British to halt piracy of the rich trade route to India. Doug McClure, playing a Colonial American, volunteers to silence the guns of the pirate port of Diego Suarez and in regulation style accomplishes his mission. If the plot and dialog creak a bit, ingredients are still there to suffice as an okay buccaneer yarn if the spectator doesn't take it too seriously.

Madagascar, circa 1700, backdrops the screenplay [from a story by coscripter Aeneas MacKenzie] which twirls around efforts of the British to halt piracy of the rich trade route to India. Doug McClure, playing a Colonial American, volunteers to silence the guns of the pirate port of Diego Suarez and in regulation style accomplishes his mission. If the plot and dialog creak a bit, ingredients are still there to suffice as an okay buccaneer yarn if the spectator doesn’t take it too seriously.

McClure smiles through most of his performance, and Jill St John dons some beguiling attire sometimes more exciting than the action. Guy Stockwell is the pirate first mate out to get the hero. Mary Ann Mobley as the daughter of the emperor of India and Kurt Kasznar, leader of an acrobatic troup which helps McClure, add their talents to brighten the unfoldment.

Don Weis direction is fast but tighter editing would benefit. Clifford Stine’s color photography is handsome.

The King's Pirate

Production

Director Don Weis; Producer Robert Arthur; Screenplay Paul Wayne, Aeneas MacKenzie, Joseph Hoffman; Camera Clifford Stine; Editor Russell F. Schoengarth; Music Ralph Ferraro; Art Director Alexander Golitzen, George C. Webb

Crew

(Color) Extract of a review from 1967. Running time: 100 MIN.

With

Doug McClure Jill St John Guy Stockwell Mary Ann Mobley Kurt Kasznar Richard Deacon)
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