Review: ‘Our Mother’s House’

Our Mother's House, a film about children but not to be considered in any way a kiddie pic, is a well-made look at family life and parenthood by seven destitute moppets. Dirk Bogarde stars in an excellent performance as their long-lost legal father, who is not the total heel he seems; nor, for that matter are the kids all angels.

Our Mother’s House, a film about children but not to be considered in any way a kiddie pic, is a well-made look at family life and parenthood by seven destitute moppets. Dirk Bogarde stars in an excellent performance as their long-lost legal father, who is not the total heel he seems; nor, for that matter are the kids all angels.

Julian Gloag’s novel has been adapted into a good screenplay which develops neatly the accelerated maturing of children after the death of their long-ailing mother (Annette Carell).

Latter, object of adulation, is buried in the back yard, eldest child Margaret Brooks imposing her belief on others that this will eliminate orphanage fears. To all except eldest son Louis Sheldon Williams, she conceals existence of a father, Bogarde.

Our Mother's House

UK - US

Production

Heron/M-G-M. Director Jack Clayton; Producer Jack Clayton; Screenplay Jeremy Brooks, Haya Harareet; Camera Larry Pizer; Editor Tom Priestley; Music Georges Delerue; Art Director Reece Pemberton

Crew

(Color) Extract of a review from 1967. Running time: 104 MIN.

With

Dirk Bogarde Margaret Brooks Pamela Franklin Louis Sheldon Williams John Gugolka Mark Lester
Want to read more articles like this one? SUBSCRIBE TO VARIETY TODAY.
Post A Comment 0

Leave a Reply

No Comments

Comments are moderated. They may be edited for clarity and reprinting in whole or in part in Variety publications.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

More Film News from Variety

Loading