Review: ‘Maroc 7’

The cops-and-robbers thriller lacks the necessary for such a subject. Writer David Osborn's main ace is to make most of his leading characters suspect, although cinemagoers will often be in doubt as to whether the characters are goodies or baddies and the answer never offers much of a kick. Performances are mainly smooth but do not engineer much excitement. On the other hand, the genuine Moroccan backgrounds give a colorful zest to the action.

The cops-and-robbers thriller lacks the necessary for such a subject. Writer David Osborn’s main ace is to make most of his leading characters suspect, although cinemagoers will often be in doubt as to whether the characters are goodies or baddies and the answer never offers much of a kick. Performances are mainly smooth but do not engineer much excitement. On the other hand, the genuine Moroccan backgrounds give a colorful zest to the action.

Story has Cyd Charisse as a sophisticated editress of a fashionable magazine. Her frequent trips abroad with a photographic team and a bunch of leggy, photogenic models are ostensibly for magazine layouts, but actually are a front for daring jewel robberies. Her chief model (Elsa Martinelli) and her cameraman-partner (Leslie Phillips) are both in on the murky deals.

Suspecting this, special cop Gene Barry poses as a thief, uses a blackmailing technique and forces Charisse to let him tag along on her latest trip to Morocco, where she’s got her predatory eye on a priceless medallion.

Maroc 7

UK

Production

Cyclone/Rank. Director Gerry O'Hara; Producer John Gale, Leslie Phillips; Screenplay David Osborn; Camera Kenneth Talbot; Editor John Jympson; Music Kenneth V. Jones, Paul Ferris; Art Director Seamus Flannery

Crew

(Color) Widescreen. Available on VHS. Extract of a review from 1967. Running time: 91 MIN.

With

Gene Barry Cyd Charisse Elsa Martinelli Leslie Phillips Denholm Elliott Alexandra Stewart
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