Review: ‘I’ll Never Forget What’s ‘Is Name’

Story concerns a successful and resentful whizkid of the advertising game (Oliver Reed), who opts out to join a pal in running an esoteric literary magazine. Separated from his wife, he is a womanizer of perpetual appetite, taking one off to a lonely and disused railroad station and establishing a flightly relationship with a secretary (Carol White), who is prim at heart and takes it all seriously.

Story concerns a successful and resentful whizkid of the advertising game (Oliver Reed), who opts out to join a pal in running an esoteric literary magazine. Separated from his wife, he is a womanizer of perpetual appetite, taking one off to a lonely and disused railroad station and establishing a flightly relationship with a secretary (Carol White), who is prim at heart and takes it all seriously.

Thus the theme is the aridity of fashionable achievement, and the sour smell of success is hammered home by director Michael Winner with an insistence that destroys its own claims and closes with a final scene of stunning vulgarity.

Oliver Reed looks grim and disenchanted throughout, but hasn’t the power to suggest that there’s much talent going to waste.

In addition to Orson Welles, White registers as the girl torn between her virginal upbringing and her beckoning by Reed. The role is inconclusive, but she gives it the stamp of charm and unforced sweetness.

I'll Never Forget What's 'Is Name

UK

Production

Universal/Scimitar. Director Michael Winner; Producer Michael Winner; Screenplay Peter Draper; Camera Otto Heller; Editor Bernard Gribble; Music Francis Lai; Art Director Seamus Flannery

Crew

(Color) Extract of a review from 1967. Running time: 97 MIN.

With

Orson Welles Oliver Reed Carol White Harry Andrews Michael Hordern Wendy Craig
Want to read more articles like this one? SUBSCRIBE TO VARIETY TODAY.
Post A Comment 0

Leave a Reply

No Comments

Comments are moderated. They may be edited for clarity and reprinting in whole or in part in Variety publications.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

More Film News from Variety

Loading