Review: ‘Camelot’

On the sumptuous face of it, Camelot qualifies as one of Hollywood's alltime great screen musicals. While most big musicals have fine production, dazzling costumes and all that, what gives Camelot special value is a central dramatic conflict that throbs with human anguish and compassion.

On the sumptuous face of it, Camelot qualifies as one of Hollywood’s alltime great screen musicals. While most big musicals have fine production, dazzling costumes and all that, what gives Camelot special value is a central dramatic conflict that throbs with human anguish and compassion.

Camelot never need resort to the more obvious kind of added action. The focus is kept on the three mentally-tortured people, the cuckolded king, the cheating queen, the confused knight.

All of this is against the often exquisite sets and costumes of John Truscott, the creative use of research that is constantly visible. The fine camera work of Richard H. Kline, the clever screenplay by Alan Jay Lerner, the singular appropriateness to time and place of the Frederick Loewe score as lovingly managed by Alfred Newman are all major contributions.

Joshua Logan rates extraordinary tribute for the performances he elicits from Richard Harris as King Arthur, Vanessa Redgrave as Guinevere, and Franco Nero as the knight whose idealism succumbs to passion.

1967: Best Art Direction, Adapted Scoring, Costume Design.

Nominations: Best Cinematography, Sound

Camelot

Production

Warner/Seven Arts. Director Joshua Logan; Producer Jack L. Warner; Screenplay Alan Jay Lerner; Camera Richard H. Kline; Editor Folmar Blangsted; Music Alfred Newman (dir.);; Art Director John Truscott

Crew

(Color) Widescreen. Available on VHS, DVD. Extract of a review from 1967. Running time: 179 MIN.

With

Richard Harris Vanessa Redgrave Franco Nero David Hemmings Lionel Jeffries Estelle Winwood
Want to read more articles like this one? SUBSCRIBE TO VARIETY TODAY.
Post A Comment 0

Leave a Reply

No Comments

Comments are moderated. They may be edited for clarity and reprinting in whole or in part in Variety publications.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

More Film News from Variety

Loading