Review: ‘Beach Red’

In contrast to many professedly anti-war films, Beach Red is indisputably sincere in its war is hell message. Except for brief reveries of civilian life, the film focuses entirely on a single dreary campaign by an American unit out to take a Japanese-held island in the Pacific.

In contrast to many professedly anti-war films, Beach Red is indisputably sincere in its war is hell message. Except for brief reveries of civilian life, the film focuses entirely on a single dreary campaign by an American unit out to take a Japanese-held island in the Pacific.

Notably absent are the usual stereotypes: the tough-talking sarge with the heart of gold, the frightened kid who becomes a man in combat, etc. The trouble with the screenplay, adapted from Peter Bowman’s 1945 novel, is that little is substituted for these wisely-avoided cliches. The central characters are spokesmen for differing points of view, not real, full-bodied people. The acting quality suffers as a result.

The captain (Cornel Wilde) loves his wife and hates war. The sergeant (Rip Torn) derives sadistic pleasure from the war. An 18-year-old minister’s son (Patrick Wolfe) remembers his girl back home and inarticulately echoes the captain’s pacificism. His Southern sidekick (Burr DeBenning) is a hearty illiterate for whom the armed forces is a haven.

1967: Nomination: Best Editing

Beach Red

Production

United Artists. Director Cornel Wilde; Producer Cornel Wilde; Screenplay Clint Johnston, Donald A. Peters, Jefferson Pascal; Camera Cecil R. Cooney; Editor Frank P. Keller; Music Elbey Vid, Antonio Buenaventura; Art Director Francisco Balangue

Crew

(Color) Extract of a review from 1967. Running time: 105 MIN.

With

Cornel Wilde Rip Torn Burr DeBenning Patrick Wolfe Jean Wallace Jaime Sanchez
Want to read more articles like this one? SUBSCRIBE TO VARIETY TODAY.
Post A Comment 0

Leave a Reply

No Comments

Comments are moderated. They may be edited for clarity and reprinting in whole or in part in Variety publications.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

More Film News from Variety

Loading