Review: ‘The Whisperers’

Low-budgeter [from a novel by Robert Nicolson] centers around an old woman, estranged from her husband, who lives alone in a broken-down, tiny flat in a slummy outskirt of a British town. Her imaginary dream of sudden riches due her from a relative unexpectedly comes true one day when her son hides the haul of a robbery in her spare room, and she finds it.

Low-budgeter [from a novel by Robert Nicolson] centers around an old woman, estranged from her husband, who lives alone in a broken-down, tiny flat in a slummy outskirt of a British town. Her imaginary dream of sudden riches due her from a relative unexpectedly comes true one day when her son hides the haul of a robbery in her spare room, and she finds it.

Few other films have attacked the unglamorous but poignant theme of old-age loneliness with such understated feeling and unsentimental taste and discretion.

It has in Edith Evans’ great performance an invaluable asset. Her portrayal of the ageing woman, now living on the near edge of insanity but unbowed by other physical hazards, determinedly struggling ahead in her waning fight for life, but head high, without complaints, makes the film.

1967: Nomination: Best Actress (Edith Evans)

The Whisperers

UK

Production

United Artists. Director Bryan Forbes; Producer Michael S. Laughlin, Ronald Shedlo; Screenplay Bryan Forbes; Camera Gerry Turpin; Editor Anthony Harvey; Music John Barry; Art Director Ray Sims

Crew

(B&W) Extract of a review from 1966. Running time: 103 MIN.

With

Edith Evans Eric Portman Nanette Newman Gerald Sim Avis Bunnage Ronald Fraser
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