Review: ‘The Spy with My Face’

The Spy With My Face, new version of an old Man From U.N.C.L.E. episode, is perhaps most garbled, plotwise, of any entry in the [mid-1960s] spymelodrama cycle. Thrush, that band of murderous renegades that would rule the world and is constantly combating U.N.C.L.E., fixes up one of its agents to be the exact double of Napoleon Solo, the goodguy, and nearly succeeds in its purpose - whatever that is.

The Spy With My Face, new version of an old Man From U.N.C.L.E. episode, is perhaps most garbled, plotwise, of any entry in the [mid-1960s] spymelodrama cycle. Thrush, that band of murderous renegades that would rule the world and is constantly combating U.N.C.L.E., fixes up one of its agents to be the exact double of Napoleon Solo, the goodguy, and nearly succeeds in its purpose – whatever that is.

New footage was added to the original TV segment hour’s length to bring it up to 86 minutes for theatrical release.

Film loses sight of story line, which has something to do with transporting a new combination to a vault in Switzerland containing a scientific secret of world import. Vaughn plays his double role straight, and Senta Berger is in as a beauteous she-spy. Femme honors, however go to Sharon Farrell as a cute sexpot. David McCallum appears in his familiar sidekick role, as does Leo G. Carroll as U.N.C.L.E. topper, and Michael Evans is the smooth heavy.

The Spy with My Face

Production

M-G-M/Arena. Director John Newland; Producer Sam Rolfe; Screenplay Clyde Ware, Joseph Calvelli; Camera Fred Koenekamp; Editor Joseph Dervin; Music Morton Stevens; Art Director George W. Davis, Merrill Pye

Crew

(Color) Extract of a review from 1966. Running time: 86 MIN.

With

Robert Vaughn Senta Berger David McCallum Leo G. Carroll Michael Evans Sharon Farrell
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