Review: ‘The Shuttered Room’

With a good quota of shudders and a neat suggestion of evil throughout, this is an efficient entry in a somewhat oldfashioned vein of melodrama. Although supposedly taking place in New England, the locations are blatantly British scenery.

With a good quota of shudders and a neat suggestion of evil throughout, this is an efficient entry in a somewhat oldfashioned vein of melodrama. Although supposedly taking place in New England, the locations are blatantly British scenery.

Susannah Kelton (Carol Lynley) has inherited an old millhouse on a remote island, and turns up there with husband Mike (Gig Young) to take possession. A prolog already has warned that there’s a mad dame locked up in an upper story. Ethan (Oliver Reed), who heads a mischievous gang of layabouts, surveys her with a morose and lascivious eye.

The script is adequate in the plotting but feeble in the dialog department, sparking off untoward laffs in the wrong places. Lynley is competently scared throughout. And Reed brings a brooding touch of lechery to the over-excited Ethan.

The Shuttered Room

UK

Production

Seven Arts. Director David Greene; Producer Phillip Hazelton; Screenplay D.B. Ledrov, Nathaniel Tanchuck; Camera Ken Hodges; Editor Brian Smedley-Aston; Music Basil Kirchin; Art Director Brian Eatwell

Crew

(Color) Available on VHS. Extract of a review from 1966. Running time: 99 MIN.

With

Gig Young Carol Lynley Oliver Reed Flora Robson William Devlin Bernard Kay
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