Review: ‘The Idol’

The screenplay, based on Ugo Liberatore's original story, focuses on an irresponsible American art student in London, a disbeliever in everything except himself and his own talents. He has become friendly with a young man studying to be a doctor, completely under his mother's domination, and an English girl, also an art student. They form a romantic triangle, and later the mother, who at first takes a dislike to the brash young American, finds herself attracted to him.

The screenplay, based on Ugo Liberatore’s original story, focuses on an irresponsible American art student in London, a disbeliever in everything except himself and his own talents. He has become friendly with a young man studying to be a doctor, completely under his mother’s domination, and an English girl, also an art student. They form a romantic triangle, and later the mother, who at first takes a dislike to the brash young American, finds herself attracted to him.

Leonard Lightstone has given impressive physical backing to his production, capturing the feeling of London, which Ken Higgins limns in his sensitive photography, but characters lack much interest. Daniel Petrie’s direction registers as well as script will allow and cast performs satisfactorily.

The Idol

UK

Production

Embassy. Director Daniel Petrie; Producer Leonard Lightstone; Screenplay Millard Lampell; Camera Ken Higgins; Editor Jack Slade; Music John Dankworth; Art Director George Provis

Crew

(B&W) Extract of a review from 1966. Running time: 109 MIN.

With

Jennifer Jones Michael Parks John Leyton Jennifer Hilary Guy Doleman Natasha Pyne
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