Doris Day enters the world of rocketry and espionage in The Glass Bottom Boat, an expensively-mounted production given frequently to sight gags and frenzied comedy performances.

Doris Day enters the world of rocketry and espionage in The Glass Bottom Boat, an expensively-mounted production given frequently to sight gags and frenzied comedy performances.

Star plays a conscientious public relations staffer in a space laboratory where Rod Taylor, the engineering genius heading the facility, has invented a device both the US government and the Soviets want. He falls for her and to keep her always by his side invents the idea of having her write a very definitive biography of him. She becomes a spy suspect because she has a dog named Vladimir, which she’s always calling on the telephone so its ringing will give her pet exercise when she isn’t there, and because she follows a standing order that every bit of paper should be burned.

Arthur Godfrey scores strongly as her father, operator of a glass-bottom sightseeing boat at Catalina. Taylor lends his usual masculine presence effectively, both as the inventor and romantic vis-a-vis.

The Glass Bottom Boat

Production

M-G-M/Arwin-Reame. Director Frank Tashlin; Producer Martin Melcher, Everett Freeman; Screenplay Everett Freeman; Camera Leon Shamroy; Editor John McSweeney; Music Frank DeVol; Art Director George W. Davis, Edward Carfagno

Crew

(Color) Widescreen. Available on VHS. Extract of a review from 1966. Running time: 110 MIN.

With

Doris Day Rod Taylor Arthur Godfrey John McGiver Paul Lynde Edward Andrews
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