Review: ‘Murderers’ Row’

It's a wise film producer who knows his own success formula. About the only changes made by Irving Allen in his sequel (also from a novel by Donald Hamilton) to the successful The Silencers are in scenery, girls and costumes. The addition of Ann-Margret is notable for some abandoned choreography and a chance to use both of her expressions # the open-mouthed Monroe imitation and the slinky Theda Bara bit.

It’s a wise film producer who knows his own success formula. About the only changes made by Irving Allen in his sequel (also from a novel by Donald Hamilton) to the successful The Silencers are in scenery, girls and costumes. The addition of Ann-Margret is notable for some abandoned choreography and a chance to use both of her expressions # the open-mouthed Monroe imitation and the slinky Theda Bara bit.

This time out, Dean Martin’s secret agent has to trek to the Riviera to catch that bad old Karl Malden who’s about to blow up Washington with a secret beam.

Director Henry Levin’s stress on action takes the film out of the comedy range at times. Helm is, of course, given some ridiculous special weapons # this time, a delayed-reaction gun is worked to death (no pun intended). But whenever the viewer begins to take things seriously, Levin cuts back to a laugh bit (Martin ripping off Ann-Margret’s miniskirt, which contains an explosive, and hurling it at a wall decorated with Frank Sinatra’s picture).

Murderers' Row

Production

Meadway-Claude/Columbia. Director Henry Levin; Producer Irving Allen; Screenplay Herbert Baker; Camera Sam Leavitt; Editor Walter Thompson; Music Lalo Schifrin; Art Director Joe Wright

Crew

(Color) Available on VHS. Extract of a review from 1966. Running time: 108 MIN.

With

Dean Martin Ann-Margret Karl Malden Camilla Sparv James Gregory Beverly Adams
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