Review: ‘Finders Keepers’

George H. Brown's storyline about a minibomb dropped by accident from an American plane over Spain and subsequent attempts by various foreign 'spies' to locate it could have had a good astringent and satirical tang. The theme is not only largely frittered away but is hardly suitable for a relaxed, easygoing musicomedy designed to showcase a pop group such as Cliff Richard and The Shadows. Wit gets lost, and incidents are held up, to make room for inevitable song, dance and fiesta.

George H. Brown’s storyline about a minibomb dropped by accident from an American plane over Spain and subsequent attempts by various foreign ‘spies’ to locate it could have had a good astringent and satirical tang. The theme is not only largely frittered away but is hardly suitable for a relaxed, easygoing musicomedy designed to showcase a pop group such as Cliff Richard and The Shadows. Wit gets lost, and incidents are held up, to make room for inevitable song, dance and fiesta.

Richard and The Shadows hitchhike to a hotel in Spain and find it deserted. The dropped bomb has sent everybody scurrying away. The lads, with the help of a local charmer (Viviane Ventura), decide that it’s in their interests to find it and hand it over to the US troops who have moved in on a similar mission.

Michael Pertwee’s screenplay does not build up much urgency or suspense but provides opportunity for colorful fiesta, a gentle romance between Richard and Ventura, some verbal dueling between Robert Morley and Graham Stark.

Finders Keepers

UK

Production

Interstate/United Artists. Director Sidney Hayers; Producer George H. Brown; Screenplay Michael Pertwee; Camera Alan Hume; Editor Tristam Cones; Music The Shadows; Art Director Jack Sheripan

Crew

(Color) Available on VHS. Extract of a review from 1966. Running time: 94 MIN.

With

Cliff Richard The Shadows Robert Morley Peggy Mount Viviane Ventura Graham Stark
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