Review: ‘Beau Geste’

Third time out for one of the most memorable silent films still packs hardy entertainment. The production is an expertly-made translation of Percival Christopher Wren's novel of the French Foreign Legion in a lonely Sahara outpost, distinguished by good acting, fine photographic values and fast direction. Guy Stockwell delineates the title role.

Third time out for one of the most memorable silent films still packs hardy entertainment. The production is an expertly-made translation of Percival Christopher Wren’s novel of the French Foreign Legion in a lonely Sahara outpost, distinguished by good acting, fine photographic values and fast direction. Guy Stockwell delineates the title role.

Plot has been slightly changed. Beau and his brother, John, are now Americans instead of English, and the third brother, Digby, has been eliminated. While still a story of brother love under fire, this facet has been somewhat subordinated for a script focusing on the savagery of the sergeant, a dominant point previously but accentuated even more in this version. Basic storyline has been little altered, Beau having joined the Legion

after shouldering the blame for a crime he did not commit to save another from disgrace.

Topnotch performances are contributed right down the line. Stockwell handles himself creditably and convincingly.

Beau Geste

Production

Universal. Director Douglas Heyes; Producer Walter Seltzer; Screenplay Douglas Heyes; Camera Bud Thackery; Editor Russell F. Schoengarth; Music Hans J. Salter; Art Director Alexander Golitzen, Henry Bumstead

Crew

(Color) Widescreen. Available on VHS. Extract of a review from 1966. Running time: 105 MIN.

With

Guy Stockwell Doug McClure Leslie Nielsen Telly Savalas David Mauro Robert Wolders
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