Review: ‘Any Wednesday’

Based on Muriel Resnik's popular legiter, Any Wednesday emerges in screen translation as an outstanding sophisticated comedy about marital infidelity. Adaptation and production by Julius J. Epstein is very strong, enhanced by solid direction and excellent performances.

Based on Muriel Resnik’s popular legiter, Any Wednesday emerges in screen translation as an outstanding sophisticated comedy about marital infidelity. Adaptation and production by Julius J. Epstein is very strong, enhanced by solid direction and excellent performances.

Epstein’s zesty adaptation wisely distributes the comedy emphasis among all four principals Jason Robards, the once-a-week philanderer; Jane Fonda, his two-year Wednesday date; Dean Jones, whose arrival rocks Robards’ dreamboat; and Rosemary Murphy, recreating in superior fashion her original Broadway role as Robards’ wife.

Interactions between principals are uniformly strong, both in dialog and acting as well as in very effective use of split-screen effects.

Fonda comes across quite well as the girl who can’t make up her mind, although she has a tendency to overplay certain bits in what might be called an exaggerated Doris Day manner. Jones impresses as a likeable comedy performer whose underlying dramatic ability gets a good showcasing here. Robards is outstanding as the likeable lecher who winds up losing both his mistress and his wife.

Any Wednesday

Production

Warner. Director Robert Ellis Miller; Producer Julius J. Epstein; Writer Julius J. Epstein; Camera Harold Lipstein Editor Stefan Arnsten; Music George Duning Art Al Sweeney

Crew

(Color) Available on VHS. Extract of a review from 1966. Running time: 109 MIN.

With

Jane Fonda Jason Robards Dean Jones Rosemary Murphy Ann Prentiss Jack Fletcher
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