Review: ‘None But the Brave’

Marking the first joint screen venture actually filmed by an American and Japanese company in the US, None but the Brave manages a high level of interest via its unusual premise and action-adventure backdrop.

Marking the first joint screen venture actually filmed by an American and Japanese company in the US, None but the Brave manages a high level of interest via its unusual premise and action-adventure backdrop.

Frank Sinatra, who also stars with Clint Walker and produces, makes his directorial bow and is responsible for some good effects in maintaining a suspenseful pace. The compact and mostly tenseful screenplay tells its story [by Kikumaru Okuda] through the eyes of a Japanese lieutenant, commanding a small detachment of troops forgotten on an uncharted South Pacific island where an American plane carrying US Marines crashlands.

A truce is arranged by the Japanese commander and Walker, the American pilot and senior officer, after Sinatra, as a pharmacist’s mate, amputates the leg of one of the Japanese soldiers wounded in a skirmish with the Americans. Americans’ radio is believed destroyed in the crash, and with no means of communication for the Japanese it seems that both sides are destined to sweat out the war on the island.

Sinatra appears only intermittently, his character only important in the operation scene which he enacts dramatically.

None But the Brave

US - Japan

Production

Artanis/Tokyo Eiga-Toho. Director Frank Sinatra; Producer Frank Sinatra, Kikumaru Okuda; Screenplay John Twist, Katsuya Susaki; Camera Harold Lipstein; Editor Sam O'Steen; Music John Williams; Art Director LeRoy Deane

Crew

(Color) Widescreen. Available on VHS, DVD. Extract of a review from 1965. Running time: 105 MIN.

With

Frank Sinatra Clint Walker Tommy Sands Bill Dexter Tony Bill Tatsuya Mihashi

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  1. Brian Rich says:

    I first saw this film as a 20 year old college Student studying government at the time of its release in 1965, not knowing I would be in Somewhat similar circumstances in the Jungles of Vietnam less than 3 years later. The overwhelming impression I came away with was the utter futility of War and the utter lack of moral character it builds in many ways but, not to the exclusion of those truly valiant people on BOTH sides who maintain theirs , though it costs them Everything. It was best exemplified at movie’s end when the Japanese commanders voice gives a mournful but prideful eulogy for his comrades, forced to be killed by fortunes of war and the dictates of personal honor while in blood dripping letters, the closing statement reads: “NOBODY EVER WINS!” I am 71 now and a disabled veteran of the infamous war in Southeast Asia we were not ALLOWED to fight to win by an immoral and worthless government and people who first betrayed, then abandoned BOTH we who served there in great hardship and sacrifice, and the Vietnamese we tried so desperately and HONORABLY, to help. For that, we were dishonored, denied, disgraced and discriminated in many of life’s arenas for the course of our lives by those at “HOME.” There was a time wen America would have been ashamed of that action but no more which shows as evinced by the apologies of our so-called leadership for the capture of our Naval vessels by Iran, when it has been reported that their location was provided to the Iranians by our own President! .The futility of the movie is art imitating life though later in the scheme of things. More is the pity for what we have become after once being the hope of the World, BUT NO MORE!

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