Review: ‘Baby the Rain Must Fall’

Chief assets of Pakula-Mulligan's Baby the Rain mus t Fall [from Horton Foote's play The Traveling Lady] are outstanding performances by its stars and an emotional punch that lingers. Steve McQueen is exactly right as irresponsible rockabilly singer, Lee Remick portrays his wife sensitively, and newcomer Kimberly Block is charming and unaffected as their six-year-old daughter.

Chief assets of Pakula-Mulligan’s Baby the Rain Must Fall [from Horton Foote’s play The Traveling Lady] are outstanding performances by its stars and an emotional punch that lingers. Steve McQueen is exactly right as irresponsible rockabilly singer, Lee Remick portrays his wife sensitively, and newcomer Kimberly Block is charming and unaffected as their six-year-old daughter.

McQueen, raised by dictatorial spinster (Georgia Simmons) who disapproves of his singing in road-houses, is troubleprone rebel. When story opens he is free on parole for a stabbing, and is joined by Remick and Block, wife and daughter he had kept secret.

Remick is vividly alive in spontaneous-appearing scenes with daughter. But director Robert Mulligan apparently was so determined to avoid soap-opera cliches that he did not permit actress to register negative emotion beyond look of distraught unhappiness even though sad events should have allowed room for tears.

Other cast members are adequate, but roles suffer from editorial cuts (confirmed by director) that leave sub-plots dangling.

Baby the Rain Must Fall

Production

Park Place/Solar. Director Robert Mulligan; Producer Alan J. Pakula; Screenplay Horton Foote; Camera Ernest Laszlo; Editor Aaron Stell; Music Elmer Bernstein; Art Director Roland Anderson

Crew

(B&W) Available on VHS, DVD. Extract of a review from 1965. Running time: 93 MIN.

With

Lee Remick Steve McQueen Don Murray Paul Fix Josephine Hutchinson Ruth White
Want to read more articles like this one? SUBSCRIBE TO VARIETY TODAY.
Post A Comment 0

Leave a Reply

No Comments

Comments are moderated. They may be edited for clarity and reprinting in whole or in part in Variety publications.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

More Film News from Variety

Loading