Roger Corman has garmented his film, lensed in England, with production values. His color camera work, his sets, music and plot unfoldment itself #- if the latter is vague and a bit involved it still fits into the pattern intended #- establish an appropriate mood for pic's tale of terror and in addition it's evident Corman doesn't take his subject [based on a story by Edgar Allan Poe] too seriously.

Roger Corman has garmented his film, lensed in England, with production values. His color camera work, his sets, music and plot unfoldment itself #- if the latter is vague and a bit involved it still fits into the pattern intended #- establish an appropriate mood for pic’s tale of terror and in addition it’s evident Corman doesn’t take his subject [based on a story by Edgar Allan Poe] too seriously.

Vincent Price is the very essence of evil, albeit charming when need be, and as film progresses the dark workings of his mind are stressed, tortuously intent on evil as a follower of the Devil. He plays Prince Prospero, a tyrannical power in Spain in the Middle Ages, who seizes a young girl and tries to make her choose between his saving the life of her beloved or her father, even as the Red Death is killing off most of his impoverished serfs. A strange and uninvited guest to the Bacchanalian orgy he is staging for his noble guests stalks through the festivities to transform the Masque Ball into a Dance of Death.

The Masque of the Red Death

UK

Production

Anglo Amalgamated. Director Roger Corman; Producer George Willoughby; Screenplay Charles Beaumont, R. Wright Campbell; Camera Nicolas Roeg; Editor Ann Chegwidden; Music David Lee; Art Director Robert Jones

Crew

(Color) Widescreen. Available on VHS, DVD. Extract of a review from 1964. Running time: 86 MIN.

With

Vincent Price Hazel Court Jane Asher David Weston Patrick Magee Nigel Green
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