The screenplay from a story by Elliott Arnold is a kind of southern western. It describes, in broad, vague, romantic strokes the flight of the Mayan people from their homeland after crushing military defeat, their establishment of a new home, and their successful defense of it against their former conquerors thanks to the aid of a friendly resident tribe that has been willing to share the region in which the Mayans have chosen to relocate.

The screenplay from a story by Elliott Arnold is a kind of southern western. It describes, in broad, vague, romantic strokes the flight of the Mayan people from their homeland after crushing military defeat, their establishment of a new home, and their successful defense of it against their former conquerors thanks to the aid of a friendly resident tribe that has been willing to share the region in which the Mayans have chosen to relocate.

In more intimate terms, it is the story of the young Mayan king (George Chakiris), the leader (Yul Brynner) of the not-so-savage tribe that comes to the ultimate defense of the Mayans, and a Mayan maiden (Shirley Anne Field).

Brynner easily steals the show with his sinewy authority, masculinity and cat-like grace. Chakiris is adequate, although he lacks the epic, heroic stature with which the role might have been filled. Field is an attractive pivot for the romantic story. Others of importance include Richard Basehart as a high priest and advisor who gives consistently lousy advice.

Direction by J. Lee Thompson has its lags and lapses, but he has mounted his spectacle handsomely and commandeered the all-important battle sequences with vigor and imagination. The picture was filmed entirely in Mexico: interiors in Mexico City and exteriors in the coastal area of Mazatlan and in Chichen Itza near Yucatan.

Kings of the Sun

Production

Mirisch. Director J. Lee Thompson; Producer Lewis J. Rachmil; Screenplay Elliott Arnold, James R. Webb; Camera Joseph MacDonald; Editor William Reynolds; Music Elmer Bernstein; Art Director Alfred Ybarra

Crew

(Color) Widescreen. Extract of a review from 1963. Running time: 108 MIN.

With

Yul Brynner George Chakiris Shirley Anne Field Richard Basehart Brad Dexter Barry Morse
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