Review: ‘Come Blow Your Horn’

Art it ain't, fun it is. That about sums up Come Blow Your Horn. Like its legit parent, the screen version of Neil Simon's Jewish-oriented family comedy is a superficial but diverting romp.

Art it ain’t, fun it is. That about sums up Come Blow Your Horn. Like its legit parent, the screen version of Neil Simon’s Jewish-oriented family comedy is a superficial but diverting romp.

The simple yarn is concerned with two brothers at opposite extremities of bachelorhood, the older one (Frank Sinatra) ultimately passing into a more mature, responsible phase of life when he sees in his younger brother’s (Tony Bill) sensual excesses the reflection of a ferocious personality no longer especially becoming or appealing to him. This is mighty good news to his long-suffering father, a wax fruit manufacturer from Yonkers for whom any unmarried man over 30 is a bum.

Sinatra’s role is perfectly suited to his rakish image. It also affords him an opportunity to manifest his most consummate talent – that of singer. He warbles the lilting title tune.

But it’s Lee J. Cobb who steals the show (albeit in the juiciest part) with what might be described as a ‘bum’-bastic portrayal of the explosively irascible old man who is forever appearing at the front door of his son’s apartment when more glamorous company is expected.

Tony Bill makes a fairly auspicious screen bow as the younger brother. Barbara Rush is attractive as the girl who eventually gets Sinatra, and Jill St John is flashy as a guilelessly accommodating sexpot.

1963: Nomination: Best Color Art Direction

Come Blow Your Horn

Production

Paramount. Director Bud Yorkin; Producer Norman Lear, Bud Yorkin; Screenplay Norman Lear; Camera William H. Daniels; Editor Frank P. Keller; Music Nelson Riddle;; Art Director Hal Pereira, Roland Anderson

Crew

(Color) Widescreen. Available on VHS. Extract of a review from 1963. Running time: 112 MIN.

With

Frank Sinatra Lee J. Cobb Molly Picon Barbara Rush Jill St John Tony Bill
Want to read more articles like this one? SUBSCRIBE TO VARIETY TODAY.
Post A Comment 0

Leave a Reply

No Comments

Comments are moderated. They may be edited for clarity and reprinting in whole or in part in Variety publications.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

More Film News from Variety

Loading