Herbert Lom somewhat precariously follows in the macabre footsteps of Lon Chaney and Claude Rains. Switched to a London Opera House background, lushed up in color, with a new character, a dwarf rather confusingly brought in to supplement the sinister activities of The Phantom, it still provides a fair measure of goose pimples to combat some potential unwanted yocks.

Herbert Lom somewhat precariously follows in the macabre footsteps of Lon Chaney and Claude Rains. Switched to a London Opera House background, lushed up in color, with a new character, a dwarf rather confusingly brought in to supplement the sinister activities of The Phantom, it still provides a fair measure of goose pimples to combat some potential unwanted yocks.

Basically, the story remains the same. Baleful goings on backstage at the opera which suggest that the place is invaded by evil spirits. The evil spirit is, of course, the Phantom but he turns out to be a rather more sympathetic character than of old and much of his malignance is now switched to a new character, the dwarf, played effectively by Ian Wilson.

However, the atmosphere of brooding evil still works up to some effective highlights, with the terror of the heroine (Heather Sears) paramount, the bewilderment of the hero (Edward De Souza) and the eerie personality of the Phantom still motivating the action.

The Phantom of the Opera

UK

Production

Hammer. Director Terence Fisher; Producer Anthony Hinds; Screenplay John Elder; Camera Arthur Grant; Editor James Needs, Alfred Cox; Music Edwin Astley; Art Director Bernard Robinson, Don Mingaye.

Crew

(Color) Available on VHS, DVD. Extract of a review from 1962. Running time: 84 MIN.

With

Herbert Lom
Heather Sears
Thorley Walters
Michael Gough
Edward De Souza
Want Entertainment News First? Sign up for Variety Alerts and Newsletters!
Post A Comment 0