Review: ‘Strangers in the City’

A first film by Yank Rick Carrier, this shows a Puerto Rican family in a Manhattan slum. The father is a vain, proud man with a lack of understanding of America or his family - and he has just lost his job. His teenage son and daughter go to look for work but he orders his wife to stay home. The boy runs into local racism and general hoodlumism as a delivery boy while the girl, a beauty, is used by factory workers and then becomes a sort of call girl for a dressmaker.

A first film by Yank Rick Carrier, this shows a Puerto Rican family in a Manhattan slum. The father is a vain, proud man with a lack of understanding of America or his family – and he has just lost his job. His teenage son and daughter go to look for work but he orders his wife to stay home. The boy runs into local racism and general hoodlumism as a delivery boy while the girl, a beauty, is used by factory workers and then becomes a sort of call girl for a dressmaker.

It may sound overly melodramatic, but this has a neat insight into NY life, as this producer sees it. Though this pic shows mainly bigoted people, it also depicts how their own weaknesses help betray this family. Much of the wickedness is from plain ignorance.

Some of the acting in skimpy. But Robert Gentile, as the son; Creta Margos, as his pliant comely sister; Rosita De Triana, as the anguished mother and Robert Corso, as the foppish gang leader, are standout.

Strangers in the City

Production

Embassy/Carrier. Director Rick Carrier; Producer Rick Carrier; Screenplay Rick Carrier; Camera Rick Carrier; Editor Stan Russell; Music Bob Prince

Crew

(B&W) Available on VHS. Extract of a review from 1962. Running time: 80 MIN.

With

Robert Gentile Camilo Delgado Rosita De Triana Creta Margos Robert Corso
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