This one is something of a hybrid. It is designed as a feature entertainment film, a peek at the problems of modern youth in danger of becoming delinquents. As such it stands up as reasonable entertainment. But also planted firmly in the film, some unabashed propaganda for the Duke of Edinburgh's Award Scheme for youth.

This one is something of a hybrid. It is designed as a feature entertainment film, a peek at the problems of modern youth in danger of becoming delinquents. As such it stands up as reasonable entertainment. But also planted firmly in the film, some unabashed propaganda for the Duke of Edinburgh’s Award Scheme for youth.

The pic is set in the industrial town of Bristol. Three lads are part of a gang of ton-up motorcyclists. Involved in an accident, they are banned from driving. Then, out of sheer boredom, they become potential young hoods. Luckily, they become involved with Kenneth More, playing a voluntary church choirmaster. He gives them the opportunity of rehearsing their rock ‘n’ roll combo. And gradually, they become interested in the new pursuits that the Duke’s scheme has to offer youngsters of initiative.

John Eldridge’s storyline is loose. Clive Donner’s direction is leisurely but affectionate.

More handles the role of the sympathetic choirmaster with his usual, easy charm. But the revelation is in the performances of some of the youngsters. Ray Brooks, David Andrews and David Hemmings play the three main teenagers with authority. Angela Douglas is pretty provocative as a young blonde who can handle a song and a boy with equal assurance.

Some People

UK

Production

Anglo Amalgamated. Director Clive Donner; Producer James Archibald; Screenplay John Eldridge; Camera John Wilcox; Editor Fergus McDonell; Music Ron Grainer; Art Director Reece Pemberton

Crew

(Color) Extract of a review from 1962. Running time: 93 MIN.

With

Kenneth More Ray Brooks Annika Wills Angela Douglas David Andrews David Hemmings
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