Sergeants 3 is warmed-over Gunga Din a westernized version of that screen epic, with American-style Indians and Vegas-style soldiers of fortune. The essential differences between the two pictures, other than the obvious one of setting, is that the emphasis in Gunga was serious, with tongue-in-cheek overtone, whereas the emphasis in Sergeants is tongue-in-cheek, with serious overtones.

Sergeants 3 is warmed-over Gunga Din a westernized version of that screen epic, with American-style Indians and Vegas-style soldiers of fortune. The essential differences between the two pictures, other than the obvious one of setting, is that the emphasis in Gunga was serious, with tongue-in-cheek overtone, whereas the emphasis in Sergeants is tongue-in-cheek, with serious overtones.

Although, unaccountably, no mention is made of the obvious source in the screen credits. W. R. Burnett’s screenplay not only owes its existence to that story, but adheres to it faithfully, with one noteworthy exception – Gunga does not die for his heroism. It’s peaches and cream all the way.

The ‘Big Three’ of Sinatra, Martin and Lawford reenact the parts played in the orig- inal by Cary Grant, Victor McLaglen and Douglas Fairbanks Jr. Of the three, Martin seems by far the most animated and comfortable, Sinatra and Lawford coming off a trifle too businesslike for the irreverent, look-ma-we’re-cavalrymen approach.

Sergeants 3

Production

United Artists. Director John Sturges; Producer Frank Sinatra; Screenplay W.R. Burnett; Camera Winton Hoch; Editor Ferris Webster; Music Billy May; Art Director Frank Hotaling

Crew

(Color) Widescreen. Extract of a review from 1962. Running time: 113 MIN.

With

Frank Sinatra Dean Martin Sammy Davis Jr Peter Lawford Joey Bishop

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