The Young Doctors is an enlightening motion picture executed with restraint and clinical authenticity.

The Young Doctors is an enlightening motion picture executed with restraint and clinical authenticity.

The screenplay, based on a novel by Arthur Hailey, is a generally brisk, literate and substantial piece of writing marked by a few soaring bursts of thought-provoking philosophical wisdom as regards life, death and love.

Essentially the story represents an idealistic clash between two pathologists, one (Fredric March) the vet department head whose ideals and perspective have been mellowed and blunted somewhat by years of red tape and day-to-day frustration, the other (Ben Gazzara), his new assistant, young, aggressive, up-to-date and meticulous in his approach to the job. The conflict is dramatically illustrated via two critical cases in which both are pretty intimately involved.

Veteran March creates a character of dimension and compassion. Gazzara plays with great reserve and intensity, another fine portrayal. Dick Clark is persuasive as a young intern, Eddie Albert outstanding as a dedicated obstetrician. Ina Balin experiences a few uncertain moments as a gravely ill young nurse in love with life in general and Gazzara in particular, but she comes through in the more demanding passages. Camerawork by Arthur J. Ornitz is pretty bold stuff.

The Young Doctors

Production

Drexel/Millar-Turman. Director Phil Karlson; Producer Stuart Millar, Lawrence Turman; Screenplay Joseph Hayes; Camera Arthur J. Ornitz; Editor Robert Swink; Music Elmer Bernstein; Art Director Richard Sylbert

Crew

(B&W) Extract of a review from 1961. Running time: 103 MIN.

With

Fredric March Ben Gazzara Dick Clark Ina Balin Eddie Albert Phyllis Love
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